Choosing A Certified Entomologist

Many times the work that entomologists do goes unnoticed by the general public. Entomologists work with agricultural specialists to increase crop yields, they work with building inspectors to help them identify the different species of termites, each of which might have a different recommendation for treatment. Like any profession, though, when a person needs to talk to an expert, they want to be sure they have a reliable source. That is part of the reason for the certification program. Certification is a means to facilitate process of verifying the credentials for a practicing entomologist.

Board Certified Entomologists (BCEs) are those who have passed at least two rigorous examinations to test their knowledge and are specialized in one or more areas of entomology. Generally, the BCE is more likely to have received formalized education in entomology, including a PhD in many cases. BCEs agree to ascribe to a code of ethical behavior and meet a minimum number of education requirements on an annual basis. Click here to see a roster of current BCEs.

Associate Certified Entomologists (ACEs) are those who have passed at least one rigorous examination to test their knowledge. They generally specialize in pest control. ACEs also agree to ascribe to a code of ethical behavior, and – as part of their certification renewal process – must annually provide a copy of their current pesticide applicator's license. Click here to see a roster of current ACEs.